Australian singer Abby Dobson posts photo of tick burrowed into her neck, fans provide answers

Australian singer Abby Dobson posts photo of tick burrowed into her neck, fans provide answers

After uploading a photo of a tick burrowing into her neck, an Australian musician has started a debate about how to effectively remove a tick.

Abby Dobson, a nineties pop artist and former competitor on The Voice, received scores of recommendations from worried fans on her post, including the use of lavender or eucalyptus oil to “pull” the tick from her neck.

On Friday afternoon at Bulahdelah Hospital, the 53-year-old woman remarked, “I haven’t had a love bite in a while.” She was waiting for assistance to remove a parasite.

She revealed to her Facebook followers that a huge tick had attached itself on her during a bushwalk in the Mid North Coast region of New South Wales and rendered her shaky.

She added, “I spotted a black-necked hitchhiker while driving after walking with my sister through a little patch of bush along the shore prior to a lengthy journey north.”

And after that I felt extremely dizzy.

Unsteadiness can be a symptom of tick-borne paralysis.

Early indications of tick paralysis include rashes, headache, fever, flu-like symptoms, lymph node discomfort, unsteady walking, intolerance to bright light, increased limb weakness, and partial facial paralysis, according to NSW Health.

Ticks are little bloodsucking insects that, for most people, produce nothing more than an irritating itch. However, for others, ticks can cause a wide variety of ailments, including Lyme disease and Melioidosis, and can even be fatal.

Fans contributed their own terrifying tales in the comments section of Ms. Dobson’s blog piece.

One woman referred to mid-North Coast ticks as “vile creatures.”

In the 1970s, I had a tick buried in my belly button at Seal Rocks campground, which made me pretty ill, so I empathize with Abby.

Another said, “The little buggers hurt. I hope you don’t have a reaction to it.”

In my line of work, I encounter several of them, and smothering them with tea tree oil typically drives them away (in case you’re ever unfortunate enough to encounter another).

A Sydney youngster who was bitten by a tick in 2017 acquired an allergy to red meat.

Tick typhus is a rare bacterial infection characterized by fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, and fatigue.

In the past 30 years, three people are reported to have died from illnesses caused by tick bites, while an estimated 500 canines die annually in Australia from tick bites.

Karl McManus was bitten on the chest by a tick while working on the set of Home and Away in a wildlife park on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in July 2007.

Due to the bite, he died of Lyme disease three years later.

Ticks are prevalent throughout the year, but September onwards is termed “tick season,” when dogs frequently carry them back to humans.

Dobson’s choice to seek medical assistance for removal is in accordance with official health guidelines.

The official recommendation is to apply a product containing ether on a tick and wait for it to fall off. If spraying it does not remove it, it is advisable to seek assistance.

The healthdirect.gov.au website states, “Do not pull or twist the tick.”

Use neither methylated spirits, kerosene, petroleum jelly, nail paint, oil, nor alcohol, nor a lit match.

These products are ineffective and may lead the tick to dig deeper into your flesh.

Do not squeeze, agitate, or forcibly remove the tick, as this will increase its likelihood of injecting its saliva into you.

Ticks can be especially problematic because their effects can persist even after they are removed.

In Australia, there are at least 70 species of paralysis ticks that feed on animal and human blood. They inhabit humid, moist, forested regions.

How to eliminate ticks effectively:

If a tick bite is discovered, it should not be touched, but rather covered with a bit of wet bicarbonate of soda, sprayed with an insect repellent containing pyrethrin or a pyrethroid, or treated with anti-scabies cream.

To guarantee the tick is killed, it must be sprayed (or dabbed if using cream) at least twice with a one-minute delay between applications. It should be allowed to decrease naturally over the course of 24 hours.

Using tweezers to grasp the tick’s head and a steady but firm pull, it is possible to manually remove adult ticks that carry the paralysis disease.

This may result in some mouthparts being left behind, but the tick is still killed, preventing further burrowing.

The wound is treatable with an antiseptic.

After uploading a photo of a tick burrowing into her neck, an Australian musician has started a debate about how to effectively remove a tick.


Abby Dobson, a nineties pop artist and former competitor on The Voice, received scores of recommendations from worried fans on her post, including the use of lavender or eucalyptus oil to “pull” the tick from her neck.

On Friday afternoon at Bulahdelah Hospital, the 53-year-old woman remarked, “I haven’t had a love bite in a while.” She was waiting for assistance to remove a parasite.

She revealed to her Facebook followers that a huge tick had attached itself on her during a bushwalk in the Mid North Coast region of New South Wales and rendered her shaky.

She added, “I spotted a black-necked hitchhiker while driving after walking with my sister through a little patch of bush along the shore prior to a lengthy journey north.”

And after that I felt extremely dizzy.

Unsteadiness can be a symptom of tick-borne paralysis.

Early indications of tick paralysis include rashes, headache, fever, flu-like symptoms, lymph node discomfort, unsteady walking, intolerance to bright light, increased limb weakness, and partial facial paralysis, according to NSW Health.

Ticks are little bloodsucking insects that, for most people, produce nothing more than an irritating itch. However, for others, ticks can cause a wide variety of ailments, including Lyme disease and Melioidosis, and can even be fatal.

Fans contributed their own terrifying tales in the comments section of Ms. Dobson’s blog piece.

One woman referred to mid-North Coast ticks as “vile creatures.”

In the 1970s, I had a tick buried in my belly button at Seal Rocks campground, which made me pretty ill, so I empathize with Abby.

Another said, “The little buggers hurt. I hope you don’t have a reaction to it.”

In my line of work, I encounter several of them, and smothering them with tea tree oil typically drives them away (in case you’re ever unfortunate enough to encounter another).

A Sydney youngster who was bitten by a tick in 2017 acquired an allergy to red meat.

Tick typhus is a rare bacterial infection characterized by fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, and fatigue.

In the past 30 years, three people are reported to have died from illnesses caused by tick bites, while an estimated 500 canines die annually in Australia from tick bites.

Karl McManus was bitten on the chest by a tick while working on the set of Home and Away in a wildlife park on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in July 2007.

Due to the bite, he died of Lyme disease three years later.

Ticks are prevalent throughout the year, but September onwards is termed “tick season,” when dogs frequently carry them back to humans.

Dobson’s choice to seek medical assistance for removal is in accordance with official health guidelines.

The official recommendation is to apply a product containing ether on a tick and wait for it to fall off. If spraying it does not remove it, it is advisable to seek assistance.

The healthdirect.gov.au website states, “Do not pull or twist the tick.”

Use neither methylated spirits, kerosene, petroleum jelly, nail paint, oil, nor alcohol, nor a lit match.

These products are ineffective and may lead the tick to dig deeper into your flesh.

Do not squeeze, agitate, or forcibly remove the tick, as this will increase its likelihood of injecting its saliva into you.

Ticks can be especially problematic because their effects can persist even after they are removed.

In Australia, there are at least 70 species of paralysis ticks that feed on animal and human blood. They inhabit humid, moist, forested regions.

How to eliminate ticks effectively:

If a tick bite is discovered, it should not be touched, but rather covered with a bit of wet bicarbonate of soda, sprayed with an insect repellent containing pyrethrin or a pyrethroid, or treated with anti-scabies cream.

To guarantee the tick is killed, it must be sprayed (or dabbed if using cream) at least twice with a one-minute delay between applications. It should be allowed to decrease naturally over the course of 24 hours.

Using tweezers to grasp the tick’s head and a steady but firm pull, it is possible to manually remove adult ticks that carry the paralysis disease.

This may result in some mouthparts being left behind, but the tick is still killed, preventing further burrowing.

The wound is treatable with an antiseptic.

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