In the following several nights, Jupiter will come closest to Australia in 59 years

In the following several nights, Jupiter will come closest to Australia in 59 years

Jupiter will appear brighter and larger in the night sky as it approaches Earth at its closest distance in 59 years.

In the following weeks, Australians will be able to see the largest planet up close, with Tuesday being one of the best days to observe the massive gas planet if the sky is clear.

The massive planet (pictured, with its famous 'Red Spot') is 591million km away from Earth and not since October 1963 have stargazers had such a great opportunity to spot it in the night sky

The greatest moment to see it above the continent will be at midnight, although dusk and sunrise will also provide better-than-usual views.

At sunset, it is best to view the horizon while facing away from the sun, and at sunrise, it can be seen by facing west while facing the rising sun.

The enormous planet (shown with its famed ‘Red Spot’) is 591 million kilometers from Earth, and not since October 1963 have stargazers had such a good chance of spotting it.

Jupiter and Earth are on a trajectory around the sun that is not always precisely circular (pictured, a rough illustration of the size of Earth compared to Jupiter)

Jupiter will still be 591 million kilometers from Earth, but stargazers have not had such a good chance of spotting it since October 1963.

Jonti Horner, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Queensland, told ABC that the gas planet rises at Earth’s sunset and sets at sunrise, a yearly occurrence.

This is the season of the year when the moon seems the largest and brightest.

Professor Horner explained, “At that time, Earth is at its closest approach to Jupiter for that year.”

However, some near encounters are closer than others.

Although it is one of the few planets that can be seen with the naked eye, NASA still recommends using some type of telescopic instrument to view it

Jupiter and Earth orbit the sun in a path that is not always perfectly round (pictured, a rough illustration of the size of Earth compared to Jupiter)

Jupiter and Earth orbit the sun in a route that is not always perfectly round.

Now, the Earth is at its closest distance from Jupiter, while Jupiter is at its closest distance from the sun.

This occurrence, which will not occur again until 2139, will make the gas planet appear brighter and larger in the sky.

On Tuesday, the planet will approach opposition, which is when it appears opposite the sun from Earth.

Jupiter will be directly above Australia at midnight and should be visible throughout the night, as long as there is no cloud cover or bright lights (pictured, a snap of the planet taken by the Juno spacecraft in 2019)According to NASA, this year’s views will be “exceptional” because the planet’s closest approach to Earth hardly never coincides with opposition.

In the coming weeks, Jupiter will appear slightly larger and brighter.

Even though it is one of the few planets visible with the naked eye, NASA suggests using a telescopic instrument to view it.

Jupiter will be squarely above Australia at midnight and should be visible throughout the night if there are no clouds or bright light pollution (pictured, a snap of the planet taken by the Juno spacecraft in 2019)

Professor Horner stated that the planet will be located in the region of the sky with the fewest brilliant stars.

Professor Horner stated, “This makes it more more pronounced… there is nothing that can compete with Jupiter.”

As long as there are no clouds or strong lights, it should be visible throughout the night as it will be straight above Australia at midnight.

Professor Horner said the planet will be in the darkest part of the sky, where there are less bright stars

Jupiter should be visible on a fainter scale within the following few months.

It is visible when people look to the east at sunset and to the west at sunrise.

Professor Horner stated that the planet will be in a region of the sky where there are fewer brilliant stars.

Even though it is one of the few planets visible to the naked eye, NASA suggests using a telescopic instrument to observe it.

A four-inch or larger telescope would provide for a more detailed view of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot its bands.

The red spot represents a massive, century-old storm system that could devour the Earth.

Jupiter has attracted scientists ever since Galileo Galilei discovered it in 1610 using a tiny telescope he developed.

Jupiter’s radius is 69,911 kilometers, whereas Earth’s equatorial radius is 6,378 kilometers; if Earth were a grape, Jupiter would be the size of a basketball.

The fifth planet from the sun is Jupiter.

Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System and contains 75 moons.

It is 591 million kilometers from Earth.

Jupiter would be the size of a basketball if Earth were the size of a grape.

It’s radius is 69,911 km.

Jupiter rotates once every 10 hours (a Jovian day), yet its orbit around the Sun takes around 12 Earth years (a Jovian year).

As a gas giant, it lacks a surface comparable to Earth. If it has a solid inner core at all, its size is likely comparable to Earth’s.

The majority of Jupiter’s atmosphere is composed of hydrogen (H2) and helium (He).

The Voyager spacecraft detected Jupiter’s weak ring system in 1979. Each of the four large planets in our solar system has its own ring system.

The planet Jupiter has been visited by nine spacecraft. Seven spacecraft have flown by and two have orbited the gas giant. 2016 marked the arrival of the most recent spacecraft to Jupiter, Juno.

Jupiter is inhospitable to life as we know it. However, some of Jupiter’s moons have potentially habitable waters beneath their crusts.

The Great Red Spot on Jupiter is a massive storm roughly twice the size of Earth that has raged for nearly a century.

Jupiter stands in stark contrast to what Earthlings consider normal.

Its immense size, mass, and composition, as well as the mysteries of its magnetic and gravitational fields, as well as its amazing system of moons, have demonstrated how different planets may be.

Since 1610, when Galileo Galilei first glimpsed Jupiter with his own telescope, scientists and astronomers have been utterly enthralled by the Jovian planet.

NASA Science and Universe Today as a Source

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