Before-and-after photographs depict Hurricane Ian’s devastation

Before-and-after photographs depict Hurricane Ian’s devastation

As Hurricane Ian stormed over the southwest region of the state on Sunday, bringing with it catastrophic floods and severe power outages, shocking photographs reveal the magnitude of the destruction it left behind.

The dramatic before-and-after photos demonstrate the depth of the flooding as the historic storm moves northward into the state’s center, prompting declarations of emergency in neighboring states including Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

The hardest hit city by Ian was Fort Myers, where ominous photographs depict houses destroyed by its fury as roadways transformed into rivers due to the floodwater tsunami.

The “historic” storm also wreaked havoc on Naples and the adjoining Sanibel Island; pictures from the latter show a seaside pool filled to the brim with water as the area saw gusts in excess of 155 mph.

Images depict the Sunshine State’s precarious present situation, where more than 1 million people are without electricity and compelled to live on their roofs since water levels are still reportedly rising.

A before image shows a pool and several houses near Estero Blvd in Fort Myers before the storm rocked the city

A before image shows a pool and several houses near Estero Blvd in Fort Myers before the storm rocked the city

Photos show the pool was already submerged by noon Wednesday, with the worse yet to come

Photos show the pool was already submerged by noon Wednesday, with the worse yet to come

A few hours later, levels rose even further, leaving several houses almost entirely submerged, with none of the pool and its gate now visible

A few hours later, levels rose even further, leaving several houses almost entirely submerged, with none of the pool and its gate now visible

More snaps show some of the nearby area before the flooding started around 10am

More snaps show some of the nearby area before the flooding started around 10am

Roughly two hours later, the street was almost completely underwater, as winds of up to 155 mph ripped tries out of the earth

Roughly two hours later, the street was almost completely underwater, as winds of up to 155 mph ripped tries out of the earth

By the afternoon, the area was almost entirely unrecognizable, almost entirely submerged by water

By the afternoon, the area was almost entirely unrecognizable, almost entirely submerged by water

 

»Before-and-after photographs depict Hurricane Ian’s devastation«

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