Wild weather has triggered an incredible natural phenomenon as water was seen flying over the top of the cliffs of the Royal National Park, south of Sydney, as wind gusts hit 39km/h

Wild weather has triggered an incredible natural phenomenon as water was seen flying over the top of the cliffs of the Royal National Park, south of Sydney, as wind gusts hit 39km/h

The terrible weather lashing New South Wales’ coast has sparked an astonishing natural phenomena, with the violent winds pushing waterfalls to move in the opposite way.

Water was seen flying over the top of the cliffs of the Royal National Park, south of Sydney, on Monday as wind gusts hit 39km/hour.

In a phenomenon known as reverse waterfalls, photographs show white sprays of water being spewed into the air as the waves crash against the rocks below.

Similar movement of the water was seen two years ago at the same area.

It comes after a run of crazy weather, which saw Sydney catch 148.6mm of rain throughout the last four days.

Weatherzone meteorologist Ben Domensino claimed this upped the city’s annual total rainfall to 1696mm – ‘its wettest year-to-date in records dating back to 1859’.

‘This year’s cumulative rainfall up to July 4 is 127mm greater than the previous record of 1569mm from 1890,’ he tweeted.

The Bureau of Meteorology is meantime investigating whether a tornado or a waterspout caused severe damage south of Sydney on Sunday morning.

Around 40 properties in Bellambi and Corrimal, in the Illawarra region, were affected by strong winds on Sunday morning.

The extreme weather left behind a trail of destruction, ripping off the roof of an apartment complex, while an airborne trampoline was launched hurtling from a backyard onto power wires.

A landslide was also recorded in Berkeley, leaving streets covered with uprooted trees, mud, and debris.

The Bureau is investigating what caused the significant damage and haven’t ruled out a waterspout, or a tornado that develops over water.

A total of 71 evacuation orders were issued for NSW homes following a night of severe downpour.

More than 32,000 individuals across the state have already been instructed to leave their homes while another 6,000 were told to be on notice and ready to flee.

There was considerable flooding at North Richmond, with river levels exceeding that reached in March (15.92 metres), with more rises possible, and major concern of escalating water levels at Sydney Basin, the Hawkesbury Nepean and Georges River.

The town of Camden, which has been inundated for the fourth time this year, is among the worst affected, along with Lansvale, Chipping Norton, and Moorebank in some areas.

Since the weekend, the State Emergency Service has handled 3,500 demands for assistance, 400 of which came in the middle of the night, and 120 flood rescues, with more rescues anticipated.

The Bureau of Meteorology has issued a warning, predicting that rain will continue to fall along the coast for the rest of the week and will persist through the winter and potentially into the spring.

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