• 25 Apr, 2024

In the realm of social media, where health and wellness influencers abound, Gary Brecka, a 53-year-old figure with a significant following, has come under fire for allegedly peddling unsubstantiated cancer cures without holding a medical license.

Celebrated for his association with celebrities like Kendall Jenner and David Beckham, Brecka claims to be a 'mortality expert,' guiding people tow

In the realm of social media, where health and wellness influencers abound, Gary Brecka, a 53-year-old figure with a significant following, has come under fire for allegedly peddling unsubstantiated cancer cures without holding a medical license.

Celebrated for his association with celebrities like Kendall Jenner and David Beckham, Brecka claims to be a 'mortality expert,' guiding people towards optimal bodily function.

However, recent revelations by doctors question the legitimacy of his methods.

Celebrity Connections and Wellness Empire: Brecka's Rise to Prominence

With a combined following of 2.

1 million on Instagram and TikTok, Brecka has established himself as a go-to health advisor for high-profile personalities, including UFC President Dana White.

His popularity surged when White credited him with a life-altering transformation based on tests that suggested an imminent early death.

Despite his considerable influence, concerns have been raised about the scientific validity of Brecka's methods, particularly regarding wellness products available on his website, some priced as high as $134,000.

Medical Expert Critiques: Lack of Credibility and Dubious Science

Doctors and medical experts have raised skepticism about the veracity of Brecka's claims.

Dr.

Jared Ross, a board-certified physician, criticized the weak evidence behind Brecka's wellness products, labeling their prices as 'atrocious.

'Moreover, Brecka's past legal troubles, including a 2017 arrest for theft and involvement in lawsuits, cast shadows over his credibility.

Notably, Brecka is not a qualified medical professional, lacking board certification or experience in a medical setting.

Professional Background and Business Ventures: The Unconventional Path to Health Entrepreneurship

Before his involvement with the performance-enhancing firm 10X Health, where he serves as co-founder, Brecka's career traversed diverse industries.

He was previously the CEO of Streamline Medical Group, specializing in antiaging treatments, and spent two decades in the insurance sector as the CEO of Life Asset Group.

His unique approach involves predicting lifespans based on medical records and demographic data, a practice considered controversial by medical experts.

Influence Among Celebrities: Brecka's Celebrity Clientele and Legal Entanglements

Brecka's clientele extends beyond Dana White to include influential figures like P Diddy, Steve Aoki, and David Beckham.

Despite his high-profile associations, legal concerns persist, with Grant Cardone, another co-founder of 10XHealth, facing an ongoing class action lawsuit for alleged misleading investment claims on social media.

The Dana White Transformation: Questionable Science and Controversial Predictions

Brecka gained significant attention through Dana White's dramatic health transformation, attributing it to Brecka's interventions, including blood tests and extreme dietary changes.

However, medical experts, including Dr.

Mike Varshavski, questioned Brecka's claim of predicting lifespans based on blood samples, emphasizing the complexity of factors influencing life expectancy.

Controversial Claims: Brecka's Unsubstantiated Statements on Cancer, Antidepressants, and Migraines

Brecka's bold assertions extend to unconventional cancer cures, suggesting that 'frequency' from the brain's gray matter can heal cancer—a claim met with skepticism from medical professionals.

His comments on antidepressants, SSRIs, and migraines have also garnered attention, with experts challenging the lack of scientific basis for these statements.

Challenges to Medical Ethics: Genetic Testing and Pulsed Electromagnetic Field (PEMF) Mats

Brecka's foray into genetic testing, offered on his website for $600, has been criticized by Dr.

Neal Smoller, a licensed pharmacist, who dismisses the ability of genes to determine nutrient deficiencies accurately.

Additionally, Brecka sells a 10X PEMF mat for $5,000, claiming benefits such as increased oxygen transport, despite a lack of scientific evidence supporting these assertions.