Pete Doherty’s Nostalgic Journey: Unveiling Kate Moss Mementos and Libertines’ Turbulent Past

Sixteen years after the tumultuous romance that defined Pete Doherty’s rock and roll era, the reformed musician, now three years sober, opens up about his life and times in the latest installment of Louis Theroux Interviews.

The spotlight is on Doherty’s self-styled ‘Atelier,’ a back room filled with reminders of his chaotic past, including mementos from The Libertines and Babyshambles.

Kate Moss’s Presence: A Personalized Suitcase:

Louis Theroux takes a tour of the ‘Atelier,’ where Doherty reveals he still owns one of Kate Moss’s personalized suitcases.

The suitcase, designed by Asprey, features the inscription ‘KATE MOSS – DO NOT TOUCH,’ adding an intriguing element to Doherty’s collection of memories.

Memorabilia and Chance Discoveries:

Amid piles of photos and preserved newspapers documenting Doherty’s tumultuous past, an old photo of himself posing alongside a Kate Moss collage surfaces.

Doherty emphasizes the randomness of these discoveries, dismissing the idea of intentionally curating a collection of Kate Moss memories.

TV Commercial Encounter and Relationship Reflection:

Doherty reflects on a recent encounter with Kate Moss in a Coca Cola ad, sharing how it served as a reminder of why their three-year relationship ended.

He humorously mimics Moss’s routine and reveals how a shared habit with Donald Trump contributed to his change of heart.

The Libertines’ Turbulent Past: Drug Addiction and Band Dynamics:

Doherty and Libertines bandmate Carl Barât recall a challenging period in the band’s history during Theroux’s visit.

Doherty, in the grip of crack and heroin addiction, recounts being excluded from the band and breaking into Carl’s flat to plead for his inclusion.

Barât sheds light on the difficulties of managing the band’s schedule amidst Doherty’s spiraling addiction.

Desperate Measures to Stay in the Band:

Doherty describes kicking open Barât’s front door in a desperate attempt to remain part of the band, only to discover nobody was home. Barât, performing in Japan during a ‘guilt tour,’ grappled with his own addiction issues.

The episode highlights the strain on their friendship and the challenges of keeping the band together during turbulent times.

Conclusion:

As Pete Doherty reflects on his past, the ‘Atelier’ serves as a symbolic space of redemption and nostalgia. From Kate Moss mementos to Libertines’ struggles, the musician’s journey unfolds through the lens of Louis Theroux, providing a glimpse into the complexities of fame, addiction, and artistic rebirth.

Advertisement
Advertisement: Download Vital Signs App (VS App)