Archbishop of Canterbury Faces Accusations of Aiding ‘Evil’ Gangs as Home Secretary James Cleverly Defends Rwanda Bill to Tackle People-Smuggling

Archbishop of Canterbury Faces Accusations of Aiding ‘Evil’ Gangs as Home Secretary James Cleverly Defends Rwanda Bill to Tackle People-Smuggling

Accusations Against Archbishop of Canterbury in Rwanda Bill Controversy

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, finds himself embroiled in accusations of aiding ‘evil’ gangs due to his opposition to the Rwanda Bill.

Home Secretary James Cleverly, defending the legislation aimed at combating people-smuggling, contends that critics lack viable alternative plans to address the issue.

Home Secretary’s Defense of Rwanda Bill

James Cleverly, the Home Secretary, asserts that the Rwanda Bill is crucial in the fight against people-smuggling gangs, describing their actions as ‘evil.’

Criticizing the lack of alternative plans from opponents, Cleverly emphasizes the need to tackle criminals perpetrating these activities.

Archbishop Welby’s Opposition and Moral Stand

Archbishop Welby has been a vocal critic of the Rwanda proposals, expressing concerns in the House of Lords about the government’s direction.

He believes the scheme goes against the nature of God and has committed to presenting amendments. Welby’s stance underscores a moral objection to the legislation.

Home Secretary Challenges Critics to Propose Alternatives

In response to critics, Home Secretary Cleverly challenges them to provide credible alternative plans to combat people-smuggling. He deems the Rwanda Bill too important to entertain what he terms as ‘wrecking amendments,’ urging opponents to present viable deterrents before it returns to the House of Lords.

Legislative Background and PM’s Warning

The Safety of Rwanda Bill is set to return to the House of Lords after passing the second reading last month.

The legislation aims to designate Rwanda as a safe country, overcoming objections raised by the Supreme Court’s ruling against the scheme in November.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has warned against delaying the bill, urging swift passage and accusing critics of potentially frustrating the will of the people.

Ongoing Debate and Efforts at Delay

Despite passing the second reading, the Rwanda Bill faces sustained efforts at delay and amendment.

The formal introduction of the bill to the House was met with boos, reflecting the contentious nature of the legislative debate.

The clash between moral objections, security concerns, and legislative necessity continues as the bill moves through parliamentary proceedings.