A cargo ship with 21 crew on board has become stranded off the coast of NSW without power

A cargo ship with 21 crew on board has become stranded off the coast of NSW without power

The rescue effort for a cargo ship that became trapped without electricity off the coast of New South Wales has been delayed by wild weather.

The Portland Bay bulk carrier, which has 21 crew members on board, lost power on Monday morning approximately a kilometer off Garie Beach in the Royal National Park, south of Sydney.

Authorities said the ship is now double anchored, allapping fears that it would slide onto the national park’s cliffs.

On Marine Traffic, the ship’s status is now listed as “not under command.”

Eight non-essential crew members were removed from the ship using a rescue helicopter, an aircraft, and numerous tugboats that were sent from Port Botany.

There were worries that the 169-meter bulk carrier, which is being held in place by a tugboat, would run aground one nautical mile offshore at Wattamolla as a result of the severe weather.

Around 2pm, a second tug boat arrived at the scene in an effort to control the ship and push it out to sea.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority is maintaining a communications link with the vessel through overhead aircraft while emergency services, including rescue aircraft, are keeping an eye on the developing situation.

According to Australian Defence Force Brigadier Robert Lording, there is another tugboat that is located approximately two and a half to three hours away and has the ability to tow the ship further afield from the coast.

There are 21 crew members on board, and the idea of airlifting some of them crossed minds.

“I have spoken with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, who has indicated that they consider that at this moment it is hazardous to do that and that rescue mission has been delayed.”

The Hong Kong-registered bulk freighter is double-anchored, according to the authorities.

According to deputy police commissioner Peter Thurtell, “the tugboat that is being dispatched has the capacity to pull it farther out to sea and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority will coordinate the resources needed to get it underway out of its own power.”

Due to safety concerns brought on by the hazardous conditions, a plan to transfer non-essential crew members off the boat with two helicopters has been put forth.

The Hong Kong-registered bulk freighter is double-anchored, according to the authorities.

According to deputy police commissioner Peter Thurtell, “the tugboat that is being dispatched has the capacity to pull it farther out to sea and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority will coordinate the resources needed to get it underway out of its own power.”

Due to safety concerns brought on by the hazardous conditions, a plan to transfer non-essential crew members off the boat with two helicopters has been put forth.

According to NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet, “It is obviously a very perilous scenario, and our thoughts are with everyone on board.”

But the NSW government is continuing to collaborate with Commonwealth organizations to guarantee that the problem is resolved as soon as feasible and that all 21 crew members on board are taken to safety as soon as possible.

The rescue effort has become even more dangerous because to the intense rain and gusts that are slamming the east coast.

The ship, which is registered in Hong Kong, is around 170 meters long and 27 meters broad.

It had departed Wollongong on Monday at 7.30 a.m.

By mid-morning, wind gusts of up to 54 km/h were seen off Wattamolla.

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