Water shortages in several sections of Johannesburg have gotten worse.

Water shortages in several sections of Johannesburg have gotten worse.

Some regions of Johannesburg continue to experience low pressure, to the point that the faucets are dripping dry.

THE CITY CONTINUES TO EXPERIENCE POOR PRESSURE
Earlier today, on August 30, Johannesburg Water informed its customers of the conflict in the supply systems.
READ ALSO Johannesburg’s poor water supply has an impact on several neighbourhoods.
Due to inadequate supplies and heavy demand, Johannesburg Water reports that the following reservoirs and towers are still experiencing capacity issues:

Tower in South Hills
due to inadequate supply and heavy use, critically low. In the supply zone, low pressure or no water is to be expected.
Control System

The Crosby reservoir is still low but is still in good condition.
Hursthills 1-2 Due to heavy demand and a sluggish recovery, reservoirs are critically low. In high-lying places, low pressure or no water should be anticipated.
Brixton’s reservoir and tower have improved overnight, and the outlet is now fully operational. Both are running smoothly. Due to the ongoing high demand, customers are asked to continue using water cautiously.

ALSO READ: Johannesburg Water asks users to conserve water
reservoir at Eagles Nest
due to a lackluster supply and excessive demand, remains critically low. Low water pressure should be expected for customers in this supply zone.

Reservoir Doornkop
showed a small improvement overnight, but because of the heavy demand and the gradual recovery, it is still low. Customers are asked to use water cautiously to allow for recovery even though the supply is regular.
Customers of Johannesburg Water were also informed that water supply is still being given by roaming trucks stationed at various important locations throughout the affected neighborhoods.
Municipalities in Gauteng spend billions on water tankers, as well.

“We are keeping an eye on the system and will update you as needed.”
Water in Johannesburg
This story is still developing.