Argoland, a Fragmented Continent, Found Underneath Indonesia and Myanmar

Argoland, a Fragmented Continent, Found Underneath Indonesia and Myanmar

Scientists have discovered evidence of a lost continent called Argoland that drifted away from Australia 155 million years ago. The continent is now broken into many pieces and lies beneath Southeast Asia, more than 18,000 feet below the surface of the Indian Ocean.

Geologists long suspected that Argoland existed because of a massive void in Western Australia. However, until now, the evidence was only circumstantial.

A team of researchers at Utrecht University in the Netherlands used magnetic and structural geological evidence to reconstruct the history of Argoland and track its journey to Southeast Asia.

The researchers found that Argoland splintered into many different pieces as it drifted north and west. These pieces eventually settled around modern-day Indonesia and Myanmar.

The discovery of Argoland fills in a significant knowledge gap about the geological history of Southeast Asia and the breakup of Pangaea, the supercontinent that existed 300 million years ago.

Lost Continent Argoland Discovered Beneath Southeast Asia

Scientists have discovered evidence of a lost continent called Argoland that drifted away from Australia 155 million years ago.

The continent is now broken into many pieces and lies beneath Southeast Asia, more than 18,000 feet below the surface of the Indian Ocean.

Geologists Reconstruct the Journey of Argoland

Geologists long suspected that Argoland existed because of a massive void in Western Australia. However, until now, the evidence was only circumstantial.

A team of researchers at Utrecht University in the Netherlands used magnetic and structural geological evidence to reconstruct the history of Argoland and track its journey to Southeast Asia.

Argoland Splinters and Settles in Southeast Asia

The researchers found that Argoland splintered into many different pieces as it drifted north and west. These pieces eventually settled around modern-day Indonesia and Myanmar.

Discovery of Argoland Fills Knowledge Gap

The discovery of Argoland fills in a significant knowledge gap about the geological history of Southeast Asia and the breakup of Pangaea, the supercontinent that existed 300 million years ago.

Limitations of the Study

The researchers note some limitations of their reconstruction. Many of the estimated geological ages of tectonic plate sections are based on old data, so they say modern measurements may prove more precise. Additionally, the dense vegetation cover and seas in the area complicated their correlations, and they may not always be correct.

TDPel Media

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