Planting Trees in Whitby as Part of Two Billion Trees

Planting Trees in Whitby as Part of Two Billion Trees

Today, Ryan Turnbull, Member of Parliament for Whitby, on behalf of the Honourable Seamus O’Regan Jr., Minister of Natural Resources, announced $ 2,040,946 to Canadian Trees for Life in support of the Government of Canada’s plan to plant two billion trees over 10 years. This funding will support 30 Trees for Life projects in various locations, which will see a combined total of nearly 275,000 trees planted.

As part of this funding, Natural Resources Canada and Trees for Life, in partnership with the Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority, are supporting the enhancement of the Lynde Shores Conservation Area. The 3,500 trees will be planted to further protect the natural heritage features and functions found within the two Provincially Significant Wetlands located within this 960-hectare conservation area in the Town of Whitby. The trees scheduled to be planted in 2021 represent phase one of a two-phase restoration project and further enhance work also to be completed in 2021, which includes a new entrance, washrooms, a new trail loop and a wetland creation project implemented through a partnership with the Region of Durham and Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority.

The Two Billion Trees program continues the Government of Canada’s existing efforts to advance tree planting as an important part of the solution to climate change. Canada’s plan to plant two billion trees is projected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 12 megatonnes annually by 2050. It will create up to 4,300 green jobs.

With the help of dedicated organizations across the country, we look forward to growing our healthy, vibrant and sustainably managed forests, leaving behind a legacy for future generations.

Natural Resources Canada is implementing this plan with support from Environment and Climate Change Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The Two Billion Trees program represents a 40-percent annual increase in the number of trees planted in Canada and will see trees planted in both urban and rural areas across the country. In 10 years, the new trees will cover over 1.1 million hectares, an area twice the size of Prince Edward Island.

Quotes

“Our government has a comprehensive plan to address climate change while growing the economy. This plan includes a commitment to plant two billion trees over 10 years.  We know that trees create natural habitat for many species, filter the air we breathe and sequester carbon, all while contributing to flood mitigation and having a cooling effect in urban settings. I’m very excited by this local announcement because it will add 3,500 trees to the Lynde Shores Conservation Area in Whitby, which is part of a $2-million investment in 30 projects across Ontario.”

Ryan Turnbull
Member of Parliament for Whitby

“Planting two billion trees is more than a plan for climate action. It’s a plan for creating thousands of good, green jobs. We’re rolling out tree-planting projects right across the country. Planting trees gets us to net zero.”

The Honourable Seamus O’Regan Jr.
Minister of Natural Resources

“The funding provided by Natural Resources Canada through the Two Billion Tree Program is a game changer. Not only will we be able to support a wealth of worthwhile planting projects, but our donors will be highly motivated to continue to provide support knowing that it is being matched by our federal government. This allows us to continue to focus on our mission of planting trees where Canadians live, work and play — and the Lynde Shores Conservation Area restoration project is a great example of the kind of ecological and social benefits we’ll see as a result of our work.”

Mark Cullen
President, Trees for Life

“Lynde Shores Conservation Area is one of those properties where we are able to connect people with nature, with an estimated 150,000 visitors a year. We continue to be committed to making that experience memorable and to enhancing the ecological integrity of lands we own and manage in a way that protects the natural heritage features and further contributes to overall watershed health.”

Chris Darling
Chief Administrative Officer, Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority