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News: UK national flu and COVID-19 surveillance reports

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 6 of 2021, between 8 and 14 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 192.5 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.


Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the East Midlands, with a rate of 176.7.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 87.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 541 in week 6, compared to 767 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 14.64 per 100,000 in week 6, compared to 19.40 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 20.58.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.


Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Our efforts are working as case rates, hospitalisation rates and deaths are slowly falling. The number of new infections is higher than the end of September and remains concerning. This could increase very quickly if we do not follow the current measures. Although it is difficult, we must continue to stay home and protect lives.

Each day more and more people are becoming vaccinated – when you are offered an appointment, please do take it. It does not give you the freedom to stop following the rules, as you could still spread the virus. For now, please continue to play your part by staying at home.

Previous updates

Thursday 11 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 5 of 2021, between 1 and 7 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 265.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates in those aged between 30 to 39 have seen the biggest reduction from the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 237.6.

Case rates in the West Midlands have seen the biggest reduction from the previous week.


The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 767 in week 5, compared to 1,100 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 18.99 per 100,000 in week 5, compared to 25.58 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 26.69.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

It is encouraging to see that the sacrifices we are all making are working, however we must continue with our efforts. The good direction could reverse quickly, and the rate of cases and hospitalisations remains worryingly high.

Hundreds of thousands of people are being vaccinated every day which is fantastic, when you are offered please do take it. For now, please continue to play your part by staying at home and reducing your contacts to a minimum. This is the simplest way to bring down the number of infections and save lives.

Thursday 4 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 4 of 2021, between 25 and 31 January.


Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 358.6 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 319.9.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 1,100 in week 4, compared to 1,499 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 25.26 per 100,000 in week 4, compared to 33.66 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 37.48.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

However encouraging it is that case rates and hospitalisations continue to fall across all age groups and regions, it is important to reduce the level of infection in our communities because the rates remain very high. We may have passed the peak but must not become complacent. Dropping our guard at this stage could waste everything we have endured over the last few weeks.

Please remember around one in three people with the virus do not show symptoms – but can still pass it on and make others seriously ill. Stay at home and reduce your contacts. This is the best way to further bring down infections rates and save lives.

Thursday 28 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates continued to decline in week 3 of 2021 between 18 and 24 January, while there was indication that hospital and ICU admissions began to stabilise or decline slightly.


Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 488.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

The 20 to 29 year old age group has seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population, from 669.9 in the previous week to 466.3 in Week 3.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions, they continue to be highest in London with a rate of 435.0.

London has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population, from 658.7 in the previous week to 435.0 in Week 3.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 1,499 in week 3, compared to 1,790 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 33.51 per 100,000 in week 3, compared to 35.64 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have risen in the East Midlands, West Midlands and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 49.46 in Week 3.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.


Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

There are some initial signs that the current measures are bringing infection rates down but there is still a long way to go. The rate of hospital admissions continues to rise in the East Midlands, West Midlands and Yorkshire and The Humber. We should expect deaths to remain high for some time.

By reducing our contacts and staying at home we will continue to see a fall in infection rates and in time this will lead to a reduction in hospitalisations and deaths.

This situation is tough on all of us and I know many feel anxious and worry about the pandemic – this is only natural. Looking after our mental wellbeing is incredibly important so chat to those close to you, find time to relax and do the activities you enjoy at home.

Thursday 21 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates have declined while there was some indication that hospital and ICU admissions began to stabilise during week 2 of 2021, between 11 and 17 January.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 647.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

The 20 to 29 year old age group has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population from 923.2 in the previous week to 647.3 in Week 2.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions, they continue to be highest in London with a rate of 629.7.


London has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population from 935.1 in the previous week to 629.7 in Week 2.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have increased slightly whilst they have decreased through Pillar 2 (community testing) compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,790 in week 2, compared to 1,627 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 35.17 per 100,000 in week 2, compared to 35.50 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 46.31 in Week 2.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Ruth Milton, Director for the COVID-19 response at Public Health England, said:

Case rates are falling in all age groups and regions, but it is important to remember that infections remain extremely high across the country.

Admissions to hospital and critical care remain worrying and are still rising in some parts of the country. This will inevitably lead to more deaths. The need for continued vigilance cannot be stressed enough – we must all continue to follow the rules to help ease the burden on the NHS.

Please be aware that even if you’ve had a vaccine, or believe you’ve had COVID-19 in the past, you may still be able to carry the virus and pass it on to others. It is crucial all of us act as though we’re infected to slow the spread of disease.

Thursday 14 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates have declined while hospitalisations, ICU admissions and mortality continued to increase during week 1 of 2021, between 4 and 10 January.


Case rates have decreased across all age groups except in those 80 and above, with the highest rate 879.7 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London, with a rate of 864.9 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have decreased in all locations except for the North West, South West and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,627 in week 1, compared to 1,200 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 37.20 per 100,000 in week 1, compared to 29.50 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East. London continues to have the highest with a rate of 58.19

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The rate that people are being admitted to hospital is now higher than at any point during the pandemic. We are still seeing thousands of people having to go to hospital each day. Worryingly, these numbers are likely to continue to get worse before we see the benefits of our efforts to protect the NHS, which will mean more pressure for our health service than ever before.

Please act as though you have the virus. Around 1 in 3 of us won’t show symptoms but can still infect others who could become very unwell. This is why we all need to stay at home, so we can protect our NHS and save lives.

Previous updates

Thursday 7 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has continued to increase during week 53 between 28 December and 3 January.


Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 842.5 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 904.8 per 100,000 population.

The West Midlands has seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population, with 530.2 in week 53 compared to 292.6 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,200 in week 53, compared to 846 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 27.6 per 100,000 in week 53, compared to 21.51 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions and London is the highest with a rate of 43.38.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

I want to pay tribute to staff across the health service who are working flat out to manage this virus and care for patients. The data bring into focus the huge pressure the health service is under. Sadly, we are seeing more deaths each day and these numbers will continue to rise before we see the impact of the nationwide lockdown.


We saw a sharp acceleration in infection rates last week to the highest levels since mass testing began. It is of particular concern that rates are high in those in older age groups who are at risk of more serious illness as well as people in their twenties and thirties.

There is one simple and critical thing we can all do to help control the virus and reduce infection. Stay at home, it will protect the NHS and save lives. We have done this before to great effect and must do so again as we vaccinate the most vulnerable.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 80.3% in 65+ year olds
  • 51.5% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 43.1% in pregnant women
  • 54.0% in 2 year olds
  • 56.5% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school-age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at Public Health England, said:

The flu vaccine saves lives. It is therefore very encouraging to see record-high uptake rates this season, especially among the groups most vulnerable to flu, who are also most at-risk from COVID-19.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu and we urge anyone who is eligible to take up the offer to help protect yourself, your family and the NHS.

Thursday 24 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 51 between 14 and 20 December 2020.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 434.6 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 and 39.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 602.2 per 100,000 population.


London has also seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population with 602.2 in week 51 compared to 361.8 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 922 in week 51, compared to 860 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 18.66 per 100,000 in week 51, compared to 15.18 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East but this region also has the highest rate of 23.44

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Cases and hospital admission rates are increasing across many parts of the country and the number of new daily infections are rising rapidly. This will not be a normal Christmas for any of us. If you are seeing loved ones, try to keep your distance, was your hands thoroughly and more often and ventilate as much as possible.

By continuing to reduce your contacts you can help to slow the spread of COVID-19. Remember that about 1 in 3 people may never experience any symptoms so could infect others without realising it.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 79.8% in over 65 year olds
  • 50.1% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 42.4% in pregnant women
  • 21.4% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 53.3% in 2 year olds
  • 55.7% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Thursday 17 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 50 between 7 and 13 December 2020.


Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 268.3 per 100,000 population during week 50 compared to 201.8 in the previous week seen in those aged between 40 to 49 year olds.

Case rates per 100,000 have only fallen in Yorkshire and the Humber; they have increased in all other regions.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London with a rate of 319.3 per 100,000 population.

London has also seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population with 319.3 in week 50 compared to 199.9 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 860 in week 50, compared to 786 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 15.18 per 100,000 in week 50, compared to 13.97 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the East and West Midlands

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, at 23.75

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Case and hospital admission rates have increased across most of the country and the number of new daily infections are rising. This is deeply concerning and should make us all consider our plans to see loved ones at Christmas.

A smaller, shorter and local Christmas is safest for you and your loved ones. It is crucial to remember that about 1 in 3 people may never experience any symptoms so could pass this virus on unwittingly. Remember to keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 79.4% in over 65 year olds
  • 49.1% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 41.8% in pregnant women
  • 17.7% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 52.2% in 2 year olds
  • 54.6% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible flu vaccination programme so far, with record uptake in those aged over 65 and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 10 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has plateaued during week 49 between 30 November and 6 December 2020.

Case rates have remained at a similar level in week 49 compared to the previous week across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 195.8 per 100,000 population.


Case rates per 100,000 have continued to fall across the West Midlands, North East, and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Case rates per 100,000 are now highest in London with a rate of 191.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen most in the West Midlands. In week 49 they were 158.4 per 100,000 population, compared to 196.8 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have stayed at the same level and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have slightly decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 786 in week 49, compared to 855 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 13.70 per 100,000 in week 49, compared to 14.70 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, but this has fallen from the previous week from 23.81 to 21.03.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Everyone’s sacrifices over the past few weeks means cases have reduced significantly in many parts of the country. However, the decline has started to stall and overall, infection rates remain high so we must all stay vigilant.

About 1 in 3 people who have coronavirus have no symptoms and will be spreading it without realising it. Whatever your plans over the next few weeks, remember to keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly. It’s also a good idea to think about reducing your contacts prior to Christmas to reduce the risk to you and your loved ones.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 78.5% in over 65 year olds
  • 46.8% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 40.7% in pregnant women
  • 12.2% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 51.1% in 2 year olds
  • 53.3% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in over 65s and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 3 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has decreased during week 48 between 23 and 29 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 190.3 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen the most in those aged 20 to 29. In week 48 they were 171.9 per 100,000 population, compared to 240.9 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions. They were highest in the West Midlands, North East, and Yorkshire and the Humber.


Case rates have fallen most in the North East. In week 48 they were 181.7 per 100,000 population, compared to 286.6 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 855 in week 48, compared to 1,173 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 14.01 per 100,000 in week 48, compared to 16.25 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, which also observed the largest decrease in rates.

Hospital admission rates have fallen in all regions except the South East, which had a slight increase.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over but this has fallen.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

It is very positive that cases have declined for yet another week in all age groups and all regions whilst hospitalisations are also falling. But it is important to remember that we are still seeing high infection rates and COVID-related deaths across the country.

We now have a vaccine and hope is on the way, but we must not drop our guard. Please keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly. This will help to control the virus and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women, compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 77.0% in 65+ year olds
  • 43.7% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 33.9% in pregnant women
  • 49.6% in 2 year olds
  • 51.6% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in over 65s and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 26 November 2020

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that coronavirus (COVID-19) activity at a national level has decreased during week 47, between 16 and 22 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 242.62 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen the most in those aged 20 to 29. In week 47 they were 239.6 per 100,000 population, compared to 333.8 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions. They were highest in the North East, Yorkshire and the Humber and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents was 1,173 in week 47, compared to 1,331 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 15.50 per 100,000 in week 47, compared to 16.88 per 100,000 in the previous week.


The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East.

Hospital admission rates have fallen overall. Significant falls were observed in the North West, Yorkshire and the Humber and East Midlands, but rises were seen in all other regions, with the steepest rises in the North East, South West and London.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

That this virus continues to claim an increasing number of lives is a tragedy, but there are now reasons for hope in the data. Case rates have fallen across every age range and in all regions, and positivity in both pillars has also decreased. Over time we can expect that to lead to fewer hospitalisations and deaths. The huge efforts people have made over the past few weeks are starting to pay off.

However, we must not be complacent and squander the gains we have made, even when some measures are eased. By mixing with fewer people, we can help to slow the spread of COVID-19 and bring down the number of infections. This is what will help us to control the virus and protect our family and friends.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 75.0% in 65+ year olds
  • 41.2% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 32.2% in pregnant women
  • 47.6% in 2 year olds
  • 49.4% in 3-year olds
  • 19.8% in school age children
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in 2 to 3 year olds and rates in over 65s the highest since the 2005 to 2006 season. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 19 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that coronavirus (COVID-19) activity at a national level has remained high during week 46, between 9 and 15 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen among those aged 20 to 69 years old. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 362.1 per 100,000 population.


Case rates for those aged 80+ are 245.3 per 100,000 population in week 46, compared to 235.5 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, North East and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have increased slightly and decreased slightly through Pillar 2 (community testing).

Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 16.74 per 100,000 in week 46 compared to 14.23 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in Yorkshire and the Humber and the North East

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The highest rate of infections from the last week continues to be seen in the younger generations. Whilst it is encouraging that case rates amongst those aged between 20 to 69 have fallen, they continued to rise in those over 70 who are more at risk of a bad outcome from the virus. The hospital admission rate also increased and was highest in those over 85.

The effect of the current measures does not yet appear in the data, but we should begin to see the impact soon. By mixing with fewer people, we can help to slow the spread of COVID-19 and bring down the number of infections. This in turn will help us to control the virus and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 72.9% in 65+ year olds
  • 37.8% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 30.8% in pregnant women
  • 45.0% in 2-year-olds
  • 46.8% in 3-year-olds

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake in 2 to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over is higher than ever for this point in the season.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Previous updates

Thursday 12 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Detections of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in England remained high in week 45 with a slight increase on the previous week.

Case rates have increased across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 358.9 per 100,000 population.

The biggest increase was seen in those aged 80+ with a rate of 217.1 per 100,000 population in week 45, compared to 192.4 in the previous week.


Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have decreased slightly.

Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing), as they are more likely to be in hospital, and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 14.03 per 100,000 in week 45 compared to 13.53 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East.

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The highest rate of infections continues to be seen in the younger generations, but worryingly it is rising quickly in those over 80 who are most at risk of poor outcomes. The current measures are in place to help protect all of us, and anyone can suffer serious illness from this virus.

Limiting contact with others will help to stop the spread of the virus and protect the people we love.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 70.7% in 65+ year olds
  • 35.2% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 27.9% in pregnant women
  • 41.9% in 2-year-olds
  • 43.4% in 3-year-olds

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake in 2- to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over is higher than ever for this point in the season.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 5 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Case detections decreased slightly compared to last week though this is likely to be driven by reduced testing over the half term period.

Case rates have slightly fallen in those aged 5 to 39, however continue to increase in those aged 40 and over. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 39, with a rate of 333.6 per 100,000 population for those aged 20 to 29 and 289.5 per 100,000 population for those aged 30 to 39.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Positivity rates through Pillar 2 (community testing) continue to rise and has flattened under Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing).


Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through both Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing), as they are more likely to be in hospital, and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 13.23 per 100,000 in week 44 compared to 10.36 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North West.

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Sadly we know that more people will be admitted to hospital in the coming weeks and this will inevitably lead to more COVID-related deaths.

It is vital we all follow the new measures that are now in place to reduce infections and save lives. The fewer people you see, the more you’ll help stop the spread of the virus and protect your loved ones.

Thursday 29 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 44 (data up to week 43) are:

COVID-19

Case rates increased in every age group except for those aged 10 to 19, which saw a small decrease. The rate for week 43 was 226.9 per 100,000 population compared with 234.3 per 100,000 population in the previous week.


The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 39, with a rate of 333.2 per 100,000 population for those aged 20 to 29 and 274.1 per 100,000 population for those aged 30 to 39.

Positivity rates were highest among 80+ year olds tested through both Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and in 10- to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire & Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 10.01 per 100,000 in week 43 compared to 7.74 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North West. By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to Public Health England (PHE) Health Protection Teams increased from 1,125 in the previous week to 1,312 in week 43 in England. In the majority of these incidents, SARS-CoV-2 has been detected.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.


Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of PHE, said:

Everyone has made huge sacrifices over the past few months and I appreciate just how difficult it is to continue to follow the restrictions and guidelines. In doing so, we protect ourselves, our families and the most vulnerable.

Sadly, the number of COVID-19 related deaths continue to rise, but we can all play our part. By socially distancing, wearing a face covering and washing our hands regularly we can help to cut transmission and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.


Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 63.6% in 65+ year olds
  • 24.5% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 22.3% in pregnant women
  • 32.0% in 2-year-olds
  • 33.4% in 3-year-olds

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, PHE, said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups – particularly for 2- to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Friday 22 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 43 (data up to week 42) are:

COVID-19

Highest case rates continue to be observed among those aged 10 to 29, with a rate of 207.7 per 100,000 population for the 10 to 19 age group and 274.3 per 100,000 for those aged 20 to 29, although these have decreased since week 41.


Positivity rates were highest in those aged between 10 and 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 are highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire & Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 7.74 per 100,000 in week 42 compared to 5.55 per 100,000 in the previous week.

We are concerned by the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 continues to have on Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. Almost 4 in 10 (39.9%) new critical care admissions have involved people from these backgrounds over the course of the pandemic.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rate for COVID-19 were observed in the North West. By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to Public Health England (PHE) Health Protection Teams reduced slightly from 1,140 in the previous week to 1,125 in week 42 in England. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the majority of these incidents.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.


Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of PHE, said:

Hospital admissions and deaths continue to climb right across the country, and there are signs in the data that increasing numbers of older people are now getting seriously ill.

This virus continues to have a disproportionate impact on our Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, who represent nearly 40% of admissions to intensive care.

It is essential to wash your hands, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces and follow social distancing rules. It is a matter of life and death.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 57.2% in 65+ year olds
  • 16.4% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 18.1% in pregnant women
  • 26.0% in 2-year-olds
  • 27.4% in 3-year-olds

The first uptake rates for school-age children (reception to year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, PHE, said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Friday 15 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 42 (data up to week 41) are:

COVID-19

Highest case rates continue to be observed among those aged 10 to 29, with a rate of 245.2 per 100,000 population for the 10 to 19 age group and 252.6 per 100,000 for those aged 20 to 29.

Positivity rates were highest in those aged between 10 to 19; this was mainly in those in the upper end of the age group.


Incidence and positivity rates remained highest in the North West, North East and Yorkshire and Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

Hospitalisation rates for COVID-19 were 5.55 per 100,000 in week 41, compared to 3.60 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By region, the North West had the highest weekly rate of hospital admissions. By age group, rates were highest among those aged 75+.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to PHE Health Protection Teams increased from 885 in the previous week to 1140 in week 41 in England. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the majority of these incidents.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 47.5% in 65+ year olds
  • 12.0% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 13.0% in pregnant women
  • 19.5% in 2 year olds
  • 21.0% in 3 year olds

The first uptake rates for school age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director for Public Health England, said:

We’re now seeing about 40 per cent of positive cases among young adults in their late teens and early twenties, which is causing the disease to spread rapidly throughout the community and older people. And while there are fewer cases among older people, they are far more likely to get seriously ill. That means we are also seeing a worrying increase in people aged over 75 being admitted to hospital. We must be prepared for the number of deaths to rise rapidly as a result.

This picture is particularly acute in the North of England, with the North West the region worst affected.

I cannot stress enough how vital it is that everyone follows the guidelines as they are there to help protect you and your loved ones. Wash your hands regularly, use a face covering and keep your distance.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Enitan Thompson

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